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An Amazing Story of a Girl Finding her Voice

21 Aug

Carly is amazing girl with autism, who had no voice until she learned to type. She was featured on 20/20 recently. There is a link to the story on Carly’s blog that is very interesting. http://carlysvoice.com/ Her perspective on what she thinks and feels is very insightful.

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I am J by Cris Beam

10 Aug

J, AKA Jeni is a 17 year-old transgendered teen. The writing style of  referring to J as “he” really put me into the mindset of the character. When an adult or teen would refer to him as a girl or call him by the name of Jeni, I was startled and disoriented, much the same as I expect that J felt in the story.

J has lived in an ambiguous life, wearing hats and clothing that hide his body.  Many people think he is a lesbian. He is afraid (and for very good reason it turns out) to reveal who he really is to his family and friends. When he becomes determined to live his life as a man, he finds some allies and unexpected friends who help him. He also finds that his parents are not ready to accept him for who he is.  He is forced to do a lot of educating people about being transgender, what is it and also what it isn’t.

I really loved this book. I wanted to adopt J and comfort him and tell him everything would be all right—even though I knew that his life would not be an easy one. I wanted to shake his parents—and comfort them too.  They handled his coming out badly, but I don’t think that they had the capacity or knowledge to understand. I felt sorry for them that their ignorance, prejudice and confusion got in the way of loving and supporting their child.

I recommend this book to all adults and teens, whether they are touched by GLBT issues or not, because it is a subject we need to understand and be aware of so that kids like J have support, love and acceptance.  It is also a poignant story of being true to self that all readers can relate to and learn from.

Recommended for ages 15 and up. Published by Little, Brown and Company Reviewed from an Advanced Reading Copy. Publication date: March 2011

Another view of Anything But Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin

7 Aug

While I was nosing around looking at what other reviewers wrote about Anything but Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin, I came upon a review by Ulyyf “Connie” on Amazon reviews (http://tinyurl.com/256fekc) Connie raises a good point; books written by neurotypical people about people with autism run a huge risk of being inaccurate and/or insensitive to people with autism

Many authors who write characters with autism have some real life experience with  ASDs. Kathryn Erskine, author of Mockingbird, (http://wp.me/sYHNm-18) has a child with ASD and Mark Haddon, author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time taught students with ASD.  I think that  for those of us who  work and live with people on the spectrum, caution should be taken when reading anything written about ASDs or purporting to be from the point of view of an autistic character.  It is probably not a bad idea to keep in mind that even a book written by a person on the spectrum speaks only for that particular person and not for the whole population. In my experience, people with autism spectrum disorders, while sharing some common characteristics in widely varying degrees, come in all flavors and sizes–just like everyone else.

Connie brings up several interesting points in her review:

“Well, here’s my big problem. I’m concerned that people are going to read this book, they’re going to read that Dog in the Nighttime book, and they’re going to say “Autism, if it doesn’t make you like Rain Man or Susan in that BSC book then it makes you like those asocial losers”.

It is true that a new stereotype has emerged,  surrounding ASDs. Connie says it well. We do need to use caution and common sense and not paint all people with ASDs with one brush. In addition, I recommend having conversations regarding possible stereotypes and similarities.  If there is someone with aspergers in your life–ask if they agree with the portrayal of ASDs in a book.

“This book claims to be in the mind of an autistic boy. I say claims to be because, after reading the author’s website and watching her video on the book, I am certain that the author is not, herself, on the spectrum. So what this book really is a book about a NT trying to pretend to be realistically autistic enough to write a book from the perspective of an autistic boy. A daunting task to be sure, and I start to ask myself – why? Why aren’t there more books by autistic authors? It’s not that there are no autistic authors at all – off the top of my head I can count seven or eight, and I know there are many more. If anybody is qualified to say what life is like as an autistic individual, surely it’s somebody who actually knows? “

Connie has made me commit to reading more books written by authors on the spectrum.  Because I work with these students every day, I sincerely want to understand, as best I can. I found a nice list of autobiographical books and non-autobiographical books written by people on the spectrum (http://tinyurl.com/342q8eh) . I also found Lindsay’s blog to be really interesting and will be reading it regularly from now on.

I brought up a similar subject in another blog post  (http://wp.me/pYHNm-19) regarding straight writers writing from a GLBT point of view.   I hope that as more and more traditionally marginalized authors write from their own point of view that it will inform those of us who want to understand better.  I also will continue to read and enjoy books that are well-written, by anyone who chooses to tackle difficult topics and various points of view.

Connie also writes:

“In addition to the number of books that purport to be written from an autistic perspective, there are a number of books with main characters who – if you know what you’re looking at – are almost *certainly* autistic, but the word is never mentioned.
As a rule, this latter category of books tends to be better. I don’t know why. Maybe it’s because the focus is on the story rather than the message? “

I have often found the same thing to be true.  When my son was reading An Abundance of Katherines by John Green for his summer reading, he brought the book to me and told me I needed to read it because the kid in it looked like a kid with aspergers syndrome.  The book was engaging and interesting, in its own right, and the character of Colin is a multi-dimensional character, who also shows a lot of characteristics of a person on the spectrum. Connie mentions The Lemonade War by Jaqueline Davies and Emma-Jean Lazarus Fell out of the Tree by Lauren Tarshis as books which have characters who are probably on the spectrum, but with no mention of ASDs. in the books.  I’ve put both on my to-read list.